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Inception recast → Idris Elba as Cobb, Richard Ayoade as Arthur, Anthony Mackie as Robert Fischer, Zoe Saldana as Ariadne, Jamie Foxx as Eames, Kerry Washington as Mal, Forest Whitaker as Yusuf, Michael K. Williams as Saito, Jeffrey Wright as Browning, Danny Glover as Maurice Fischer, and Gina Torres as Miles

Inspired by this quote: “Imagine a film such as Inception with an entire cast of black people – do you think it would be successful? Would people watch it? But no one questions the fact that everyone’s white. That’s what we have to change.” - Idris Elba (x)

Holy wow…I would have been all over this.

(via belle-de-nuit)

Filed under film

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I am really intrigued by this. Hope there’s a way for me to view it stateside.

fripperiesandfobs:

We’ve shared some fan-taken on-set photos from the production; now we have our first OFFICIAL set of photos released today - one above, the other below. 

Recapping… British actor/writer/director/producer Amma Asante’s period drama, titled Belle, about the trials and tribulations of a mixed-race girl, in the 1700s, stars: Gugu Mbatha-RawMiranda RichardsonTom Wilkinson, Sarah GadonSam Claflin, and Matthew Goode.

Mbatha-Raw is of course playing the lead role, Belle.

The project, which was developed and supported by the British Film Institute, with Bankside Films, the UK-based international film sales company repping the £6.5 million ($10.1 million) film, which also co-stars Tom Felton (from the Harry Potter movies), Sam Reid (playing Belle’s love interest), James Norton and Penelope Wilton (Downton Abbey).

Damian Jones (The Iron Lady) is producing, while executive producers are Steve ChristianJulie Goldstein, Ivan DunleavySteve NorrisPhil Hunt and Compton Ross.

The story takes place in the 1780s, is based on a true story - specifically, the true story of Dido Belle, a mixed-race woman raised as an aristocrat in 18th-century England; it follows Belle, adopted into an aristocratic family, who faces class and color prejudices. As she blossoms into a young woman, she develops a relationship with a vicar’s son who is an advocate for slave emancipation.

Her full name was Dido Elizabeth Belle, born 1761, died 1804; she was the illegitimate daughter of John Lindsay (a white British Naval officer) and an African slave woman known only as Belle.

We’ll continue to watch Belle, so any developments will be reported here.

It’s expected to be delivered in spring 2013.

Costumes look 1770’s, hair looks 1760’s, but I’ll take what I can get. Yay for historical films with non-white (*coughKeiraKnightleycough*) leads!

(via hoop-skirts-and-corsets)

Filed under film cinema history black chicks from history costume 18th century

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I so wish they’d shot this film in color. The costumes are gorgeous and I can only imagine how they must have looked in full color.
theladyeve:

From its initial inception up until right before the cameras started to roll, Marie Antoinette (1938) was designed to be shot in Technicolor. All of the sets and costumes were designed with color in mind. MGM went as far as to send the fox cape that Norma Shearer wears to New York to be specially dyed to match the blue of her eyes. Fearing that the addition of Technicolor would swell the already mammoth (for the time) $1.8-million budget, the production went before black-and-white cameras instead.

I so wish they’d shot this film in color. The costumes are gorgeous and I can only imagine how they must have looked in full color.

theladyeve:

From its initial inception up until right before the cameras started to roll, Marie Antoinette (1938) was designed to be shot in Technicolor. All of the sets and costumes were designed with color in mind. MGM went as far as to send the fox cape that Norma Shearer wears to New York to be specially dyed to match the blue of her eyes. Fearing that the addition of Technicolor would swell the already mammoth (for the time) $1.8-million budget, the production went before black-and-white cameras instead.

(Source: gloriaswanson, via elfoftheforest)

Filed under film cinema marie antoinette